Archive | March 2017

It’s Probably Okay, Dad

Animated police cherries lit ...


A man in a hurry, taking his 8-year-old son to school, made a turn at a red light where it was prohibited.

“Uh-oh, I just made an illegal turn!” the man said.

“Aw, Dad, it’s probably okay,” the son said. “The police car right behind us just did the same thing.”

Astronomy Picture of the Day

3D 67P
Image Credit: ESA, Rosetta, MPS, OSIRIS; UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA – Stereo: D.Romeuf, G.Faury, P.Lamy

Explanation: Get out your red/cyan glasses and gaze across the surface of Churyumov-Gerasimenko, aka Comet 67P. The stereo anaglyph was created by combining two images from the Rosetta spacecraft’s narrow angle OSIRIS camera taken on September 22, 2014. Stark and jagged, the 3D landscape is found along the Seth region of the comet’s double-lobed nucleus. It spans about 985 x 820 meters, pocked by circular ridges, depressions, and flattened areas strewn with boulders and debris. The large steep-walled circular pit in the foreground is 180 meters in diameter. Rosetta’s mission to the comet ended in September 2016 when the spacecraft was commanded to a controlled impact with the comet’s surface.

Tomorrow’s picture: just push the button



Tomorrow Crayola retires a color and adds a new one.


The Editor:  Here is a proposed airplane for fast travel, and a huge drone.

News Cat:  Southern California is blooming.

This might be a dinosaur footprint or a butt impression of where you-know-who sat.

Taxpayers pay for a bunch of births.

Amazon is about to start charging taxes.

It never ends.

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Young Stars and Dusty Nebulae in Taurus
Image Credit & Copyright: Lloyd L. Smith, Deep Sky West

Explanation: This complex of dusty nebulae lingers along the edge of the Taurus molecular cloud, a mere 450 light-years distant. Stars are forming on the cosmic scene. Composed from almost 40 hours of image data, the 2 degree wide telescopic field of view includes some youthful T-Tauri class stars embedded in the remnants of their natal clouds at the right. Millions of years old and still going through stellar adolescence, the stars are variable in brightness and in the late phases of their gravitational collapse. Their core temperatures will rise to sustain nuclear fusion as they grow into stable, low mass, main sequence stars, a stage of stellar evolution achieved by our middle-aged Sun about 4.5 billion years ago. Another youthful variable star, V1023 Tauri, can be spotted on the left. Within its yellowish dust cloud, it lies next to the striking blue reflection nebula Cederblad 30, also known as LBN 782. Just above the bright bluish reflection nebula is dusty dark nebula Barnard 7.

Tomorrow’s picture: pixels in space