Archive | April 6, 2017

THE SPHINX—THE MASTERS

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Here is a solution to the money needed to fund the border wall.   Get a forklift and go to Obama’s slush fund ( where he got a pallet full of cash to give the Iranians ).  Get a couple of pallets and send them to El Paso.   Congress didn’t authorize the expenditure.

http://freebeacon.com/national-security/iran-may-received-much-33-6-billion-cash-gold-payments-u-s/

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The Editor:   Is it time for The Masters, LL ?

Pimento Cheese Cat:   It sure is, The Masters is my favorite sporting event.   There is no yelling, screaming, bad manners, price gouging, or unprofessional behavior allowed.  Here is a little information on 2017’s edition.

http://www.masters.com/en_US/index.html

http://www.golfdigest.com/story/i-ate-and-graded-every-food-it

TE:  Is golf a genteel game of trust and the honor system, PCC ?

Mark That Ball Correctly Cat:   It sure is, although things can get a little screwy.  Maybe these officials should be sent to Washington D.C. and supervise the government.

http://www.golfchannel.com/news/golf-central-blog/great-debate-arguing-lexi-ruling/

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Dark Nebula LDN 1622 and Barnard’s Loop
Credit & Copyright: Leonardo Julio (Astronomia Pampeana)

Explanation: The silhouette of an intriguing dark nebula inhabits this cosmic scene. Lynds’ Dark Nebula (LDN) 1622 appears below center against a faint background of glowing hydrogen gas only easily seen in long telescopic exposures of the region. LDN 1622 lies near the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy, close on the sky to Barnard’s Loop – a large cloud surrounding the rich complex of emission nebulae found in the Belt and Sword of Orion. Arcs along a segment of Barnard’s loop stretch across the top of the frame. But the obscuring dust of LDN 1622 is thought to be much closer than Orion’s more famous nebulae, perhaps only 500 light-years away. At that distance, this 1 degree wide field of view would span less than 10 light-years.

Tomorrow’s picture: castle eye view