Archive | August 1, 2017

THE SPHINX—SLEEP, SURGERY, AND OTHER STUFF

The Editor:   Is this about people having trouble sleeping, LL ?

Drowsy Cat:  It sure is,  here is a cure for not being able to sleep.   Buy a  Ford Explorer or be a policeman.   The only problem you might have is waking up.   There is no wonder that the police are killing the wrong people, and knocking down the wrong doors.  They have carbon-monoxide poisoning.  Ford gives the classic reply ( it’s only a little bit ).    Maybe it is a little bit, just enough to make you drowsy or slow down your reflexes enough to hit a bus of blind children and nuns head-on.

http://money.cnn.com/2017/07/14/autos/ford-carbon-monoxide/index.html

Speaking of sleeping, carbon monoxide might put you to sleep long enough to keep you from knowing that your surgeon is doing 2 ( two ) operations at the same time.

http://khn.org/news/double-booked-when-surgeons-operate-on-two-patients-at-once/

Maybe that is why this statistic is so high.

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/05/03/476636183/death-certificates-undercount-toll-of-medical-errors

Speaking of mistakes this is a good one.  The news media can’t even print a current photo.

https://www.upi.com/Top_News/US/2017/07/29/NC-governor-orders-two-barrier-islands-evacuated-over-power-outage/9041501361841/?utm_source=sec&utm_campaign=sl&utm_medium=3

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Perseid Meteors over Turkey
Image Credit & Copyright: Tunç Tezel (TWAN)

Explanation: The Perseid Meteor Shower, usually the best meteor shower of the year, will peak late next week. A person watching a clear sky from a dark location might see a bright meteor every minute. These meteors are actually specks of rock that have broken off Comet Swift-Tuttle and continued to orbit the Sun until they vaporize in Earth’s atmosphere. The featured composite image shows a outburst of Perseids as they appeared over Turkey during last year’s meteor shower. Enough meteors were captured to trace the shower’s radiant back to the constellation of Perseus on the far left. The tail-end of the Perseids will still be going during the total solar eclipse on August 21, creating a rare opportunity for some lucky astrophotographers to image a Perseid meteor during the day.

Tomorrow’s picture: dust monster