Archive | January 2, 2018

THE SPHINX—–I’M SORRY

The  Editor:   Who’s  sorry, LL ?

Can You Hear Me Cat:  Apple is sorry for getting caught.  The French might make them more sorry.

http://whbl.com/news/articles/2017/dec/28/apple-epson-face-french-legal-complaints-over-allegedly-shortening-life-of-products/

https://www.upi.com/Top_News/US/2017/12/28/Apple-apologizes-lowers-iPhone-battery-replacement-price/6451514486710/?utm_source=sec&utm_campaign=sl&utm_medium=18

Here is some payback for the sorry iPhone glass.

https://chicago.curbed.com/2017/12/29/16830266/michigan-avenue-apple-store-winter-ice-cracked-windows

This might help.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/self-healing-glass-cracking-discovery-japan-030226371.html

Wireless charging is on the way.

https://www.upi.com/Top_News/US/2017/12/27/FCC-approves-first-contactless-charging-device/5331514353457/?utm_source=sec&utm_campaign=sl&utm_medium=5

A battle is emerging in the national parks.

http://www.govtech.com/network/As-Cell-Service-Expands-National-Parks-Become-Digital-Battlegrounds.html

This creep should be charged with manslaughter.

https://www.yahoo.com/gma/la-man-arrested-over-swatting-incident-led-police-072205194–abc-news-topstories.html

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Paper Bank

There was a university in New England where the students operated a “bank” of term papers and other homework assignments. There were papers to suit all needs. You had your choice of papers for an A-grade, B-grade, and C-grade.

A student who had spent the weekend on pursuits other than her assignment, went to the bank and took out a paper for a C-grade. She went home, retyped it, and handed it in.

In due time she received it back with the grade of an ‘A’. The professor left the following comment, “I wrote this paper myself twenty years ago. I always thought it should have received an A, so now I am glad to give it one.”

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Unexpected X-Rays from Perseus Galaxy Cluster
Image Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXO/Oxford University/J. Conlon et al.; Radio: NRAO/AUI/NSF/Univ. of Montreal/Gendron-Marsolais et al.; Optical: NASA/ESA/IoA/A. Fabian et al.; DSS

Explanation: Why does the Perseus galaxy cluster shine so strangely in one specific color of X-rays? No one is sure, but a much-debated hypothesis holds that these X-rays are a clue to the long-sought identity of dark matter. At the center of this mystery is a 3.5 Kilo-electronvolt (KeV) X-ray color that appears to glow excessively only when regions well outside the cluster center are observed, whereas the area directly surrounding a likely central supermassive black hole is actually deficient in 3.5 KeV X-rays. One proposed resolution — quite controversial — is that something never seen before might be present: florescent dark matter (FDM). This form of particle dark matter might be able to absorb 3.5 KeV X-radiation. If operating, FDM, after absorption, might later emit these X-rays from all over the cluster, creating an emission line. However, when seen superposed in front of the central region surrounding the black hole, FDM’s absorption would be more prominent, creating an absorption line. Pictured, a composite image of the Perseus galaxy cluster shows visible and radio light in red, and X-ray light from the Earth-orbiting Chandra Observatory in blue.

Tomorrow’s picture: helical space