Archive | August 27, 2018

THE SPHINX—-MORE POISON AND HOMES

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RIP  John McCain.

https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2018/8/25/17781526/john-mccain-replacement-arizona-governor-doug-ducey

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The Editor:  Aren’t you going to run our loyal readers off with so many poison articles, LL ?

XXX  Cat:  They might keep one baby from being born with Autism.  No one knows what is sprayed on imported food.

https://www.studyfinds.org/pesticide-exposure-ddt-pregnancy-linked-autism-children/

https://www.worldatlas.com/articles/is-ddt-still-being-used.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene

None of the chemical potpourri that people ingest is good for them.

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-08-e-cigarettes-dna.html

Here is some new home news.

https://www.bloombergquint.com/business/2018/08/16/cheap-and-sleek-manufactured-housing-is-primed-for-a-comeback#gs.8t3OP5Y

https://www.kansas.com/news/nation-world/national/article216981455.html

Some people want no home or responsibility.

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Total Solar Eclipse Shadow from a Balloon
Image Credit: Kuaray Project, NASA Eclipse Ballooning Project, Brasilia Astronomy Club, Montana State U.

Explanation: Where were you during the Great American Eclipse of 2017? A year ago last week, over 100 million of people in North America went outside to see a partial eclipse of the Sun, while over ten million drove across part of the USA to see the Sun completely disappear behind the Moon — a total solar eclipse. An estimated 88 percent of American adults saw the eclipse either personally or electronically. One of the better photographed events in human history, images from the eclipse included some unusual vistas, such as from balloons floating in the Earth’s stratosphere. About fifty such robotic balloons were launched as part of NASA’s Eclipse Ballooning project. Featured is a frame taken from a 360-degree panoramic video captured by one such balloon set aloft in Idaho by students from Brazil in conjunction with NASA and Montana State University. Pictured, the dark shadow of the Moon was seen crossing the Earth below. Although the total eclipse lasted less than three minutes, many who saw it may remember it for a lifetime. Many North Americans will get a another chance to experience a total solar eclipse in 2024.

Tomorrow’s picture: night blue