Archive | October 4, 2018

THE SPHINX—-VOTING & OTHER THINGS

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https://thehill.com/homenews/senate/409786-senators-will-view-fbi-report-on-kavanaugh-thursday

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The Editor:  Are people concerned about the security of their votes, LL ?

https://www.upi.com/Top_News/US/2018/09/28/Experts-US-voting-machines-still-vulnerable-to-11-year-old-flaw/3171538152947/?sl=13

One Man One Vote Cat:  They couldn’t care less.   Every bank, The White House, CIA, and  Pentagon have been hacked.  There is no way to secure votes without an ID and paper ballot.   Whoever approves the electronic voting equipment is the financial winner.  West Virginia is this week’s screwed voters.

https://pjmedia.com/election/w-virginia-announces-smartphone-voting-for-midterms-raising-serious-security-concerns/

It takes a couple of minutes to hack an electronic voting machine.  Paper ballots can be thrown away, but not hacked.

https://www.inverse.com/article/48038-here-s-how-a-voting-machine-used-in-18-states-can-be-hacked-in-two-minutes

https://www.thesun.co.uk/tech/7373518/facebook-hack-profiles-computer-security-password-change/

Even our brown brothers know that at one point, if everyone comes to America, you have the same people here that you escaped from.

https://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2018/09/24/poll-plurality-of-latinos-less-likely-to-vote-for-candidates-who-want-to-abolish-ice/

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Opportunity After the Storm
Image Credit: HiRISE, MRO, LPL (U. Arizona), NASA

Explanation: On Mars dust storms can’t actually blow spacecraft over, but they can blot out the Sun. Over three months ago a planet-wide dust storm caused a severe lack of sunlight for the Mars rover Opportunity at its location near the west rim of Endeavor crater. The lack of sunlight sent the solar-powered Opportunity into hibernation and for over 115 sols controllers have not received any communication from the rover. The dust is clearing as the storm subsides though. On September 20th, when this image was taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter’s HiRISE camera, about 25 percent of the sunlight was reaching the surface again. The white box marks a 47-meter-wide (154-foot-wide) area centered on a blip identified as the silent-for-now Opportunity rover.

Tomorrow’s picture: the last days of Venus