Archive | October 8, 2018

THE SPHINX—-THE KAVANAUGH VICTORY

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Today is Columbus Day, he was a white Italian who got good press.  Good for him.

http://fortune.com/2018/10/06/what-is-closed-on-columbus-day-2018/

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The Editor:  Can you summarize the Senate victory, LL ?

Justice Cat:  If you want the best summary listen to Senator Collin’s  reasoning.  It is about forty-five  ( 45 ) minutes long.

Here is a summary from a cat.  Feinstein kept secret for about five ( 5 )  weeks a letter saying Judge Kavanaugh assaulted a girl about 36 years ago.  She released the letter at the last minute, rather than let the Senate investigate the accusation.  In short the news media repeated the unsupported lies without any proof.  The media kept repeating the lies for weeks.  Finally, Kavanaugh had a seventh ( 7 ) FBI  investigation.

TE:  Who were the smut throwers, liars, creeps, sociopaths, and other vile creatures trying to destroy an honest man and his family,  JC  ?

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-10-06/michael-avenatti-turns-radioactive-liberals-blame-porn-lawyer-kavanaugh-nomination

These are the main ones, Feinstein,  Schumer,  ole Kamala,  Spartacus ( Booker ),  Maxine, Hill-gal, Obama,  and the many Hollywood creeps.  The most disappointing thing in the last couple of years is the main stream news has become an outspoken political arm of the Democratic Party.  Most of America doesn’t believe anything any of them have to say.

https://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2018/10/06/nolte-winners-and-losers-of-the-kavanaugh-confirmation/

If I was running for a mid-term office I would mention this and other Trump accomplishments in every speech.  All Republicans should turn out to vote–there might be another Supreme Court retirement soon.  In the meantime America has the right man.

Wanna go to Hooters for lunch?

Image result for cartoon pic of hooters waitress

Two guys grow up together but after college one moves to Michigan, the other to Florida.
They agree to meet every ten years in Vero Beach to play golf.
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At age 30, they finish their round of golf and go to lunch.
“Where you wanna go?”
“Hooters.”
“Why?”
“Well, you know, they got the broads, with the big racks, and the tight shorts, and the legs …”
“OK.”
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Ten years later at age 40 they meet and play again.
“Where you wanna go?”
“Hooters.
“Why?”
“Well, you know, they got cold beer and the big screen TVs and everybody has a little action on the games.”
“OK.”
.
Ten years later at age 50 they meet and play again. “Where you wanna go?”
“Hooters.”
“Why?”
“The food is pretty good and there is plenty of parking.”
“OK.”
.
At age 60 they meet and play again.
“Where you wanna go?”
“Hooters.”
“Why?”
“Wings are half price”
“OK”
.
At age 70 they meet and play again. “Where you wanna go?”
“Hooters.”
“Why?”
“They have 6 handicapped spaces right by the door.”
“OK.”
.
At age 80 they meet and play again. “Where you wanna go?”
“Hooters.”
“Why?”
“We’ve never been there before.”
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Astronomy Picture of the Day

Comet 12P Between Rosette and Cone Nebulas
Image Credit & Copyright: Fritz Helmut Hemmerich

Explanation: Small bits of this greenish-gray comet are expected to streak across Earth’s atmosphere tonight. Specifically, debris from the eroding nucleus of Comet 21P / Giacobini-Zinner, pictured, causes the annual Draconids meteor shower, which peaks this evening. Draconid meteors are easy to enjoy this year because meteor rates will likely peak soon after sunset with the Moon’s glare nearly absent. Patience may be needed, though, as last month’s passing of 21P near the Earth’s orbit is not expected to increase the Draconids’ normal meteor rate this year of (only) a few meteors per hour. Then again, meteor rates are notoriously hard to predict, and the Draconids were quite impressive in 1933, 1946, and 2011. Featured, Comet 21P gracefully posed between the Rosette (upper left) and Cone (lower right) nebulas two weeks ago before heading back out to near the orbit of Jupiter, to return again in about six and a half years.

Tomorrow’s picture: big swirl