Today is….The Ides of March

The Ides of March is a day on the Roman calendar that corresponds to 15 March. In 44 BC, it became notorious as the date of the assassination of Julius Caesar which made the Ides of March a turning point in Roman history.

The Ides of March marked the day the Julius Caesar was assassinated by members of the Roman Senate in 44 B.C.E. A soothsayer, or psychic, warns Caesar to beware the day, but Caesar doesn’t heed his words.
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The 15th of March was known to ancient Romans as The Ides of March, which became notorious as the date of the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44BC. … The saying “beware the Ides of March” was made popular by William Shakespeare’s play Julius Caesar.
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The actual quote is from Shakespeare’s tragedy Julius Caesar (1599). The warning is uttered by a soothsayer who is letting Roman leader Julius Caesar know that his life is in danger, and he should probably stay home and be careful when March 15th, the Ides of March, rolls around.
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The Tragedy of Julius Caesar is a history play and tragedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written in 1599. It is one of several plays written by Shakespeare based on true events from Roman history, which also include Coriolanus and Antony and Cleopatra.
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According to the Roman calendar, the ides was the day of the full moon. It corresponded to the 13th day in most months, but the 15th of March, May, July, and October. The ancient Romans didn’t think there was anything particularly inauspicious about the Ides of March, or the ides of any other month for that matter.
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After the defeat, he fled into the nearby hills with only about four legions. Knowing his army had been defeated and that he would be captured, Brutus committed suicide by running into his own sword being held by two of his own men.
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The Temple of Caesar or Temple of Divus Iulius, also known as Temple of the Deified Julius Caesar, or Temple of the Comet Star, is an ancient structure in the Roman Forum of Rome, Italy, located near the Regia and the Temple of Vesta.
56 years old.
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