Archive | October 1, 2021

The Fence Test

 

If you ever wondered which side of the fence you sit on, this is a great test!

If a Republican doesn’t like guns, he doesn’t buy one.

If a Democrat doesn’t like guns, he wants all guns outlawed.

If a Republican is a vegetarian, he doesn’t eat meat.

If a Democrat is a vegetarian, he wants all meat products banned for everyone.

If a Republican is homosexual, he quietly leads his life.

If a Democrat is homosexual, he demands legislated respect.

If a Republican is down-and-out, he thinks about how to better his situation.

If a Democrat is down-and-out, he wonders who is going to take care of him.

If a Republican doesn’t like a talk show host, he switches channels.

A Democrat demands that those they don’t like be shut down.

If a Republican is a non-believer, he doesn’t go to church.

A Democrat non-believer wants any mention of God and religion silenced.

If a Republican decides he needs health care, he goes about shopping for it, or may choose a job that provides it.

If a Democrat decides he needs health care, he demands that the rest of us pay for his.

If a Republican is unhappy with an election, he grumbles and goes to work the next day.

If a Democrat is unhappy with an election, he burns down a Starbucks, throws rocks at cops and takes two-weeks off for therapy.

If a Republican reads this, he’ll forward it so his friends can have a good laugh.

A Democrat will delete it because he’s “offended.”

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 Conflicting Thoughts  

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(1) Isn’t it weird that in America our flag and our culture offend so many people, but our benefits don’t?

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(2) How can the federal government ask U.S. citizens to pay back student loans, when illegal aliens are receiving a free education?

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(3) Only in America are legal citizens labeled “racists” and “Nazis” but illegal aliens are called “Dreamers.”

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(4) Liberals say, “If confiscating all guns saves just one life, it’s worth it!” Well then, if deporting all illegals saves just one life, wouldn’t that be worth it?

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(5) I can’t quite figure out how you can proudly wave the flag of another country but consider it punishment to be sent back there.

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(6) The Constitution: It doesn’t need to be rewritten; it needs to be re-read.

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(7) William F. Buckley said: “Liberals claim to want to give a hearing to other points of view and are then shocked and offended when they discover there are other points of view.”

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(8)  ‘Need’ now means wanting someone else’s money. ‘Greed’ means wanting to keep your own. ‘Compassion’ is when a politician arranges the transfer.”

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(9) Florida has had 119 hurricanes since 1850, but some people still insist the last one was due to climate change.

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You can’t fix stupid…. I don’t care how much duct tape you use!

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ON MY SOAPBOX….My Club

Image result for soapbox free picsWRITTEN BY: SHEILA TOLLEY

 

You have heard about Alcoholics  Anonymous (AA), right? A person joins AA, stands up to introduce herself, then the audience of previously confessed consumers of alcohol, return the greeting. The first meeting would go like this:

Me: Hello, my name is Sheila and I am an alcoholic.

Audience: Hello Sheila.

At this point, I am no longer alone. I have stood up and confessed to a group of people who I have never met in my life that I cannot handle my alcohol. My family may have asked me to join AA. A judge can make AA attendance mandatory. Many judges probably need to be in AA themselves but no fellow judge has ever demanded that they join.

I do not belong to AA, but I really am a member of a very special club. You cannot join this special club just because you desire to be a member. No amount of money will buy your way into my club.  Unlike AA, a judge cannot demand that you join my club. The judge himself cannot join unless he already qualified many years ago. In fact, if you are not already a member of my club, you can never become a member. The enlistment time has passed. There will be no future openings for membership. If a member of my club dies, there will still be no replacement member invited to join.

My club is known as The Baby Boomers. It is a Spin-Off, or sequel so to speak,  of The Greatest Generation. To join The Baby Boomers, one had to be born between 1944 and 1964. No exceptions.

We are an elite group. A previous POTUS (YUK!…obama) accused us of clinging to our “Guns and Religion.” That is the only correct statement I ever remember him making, but at least he got that one right. Members of my club think people should work for a living. They also believe there are only two kinds of Americans. Those who were born here and those who passed the test.

I cannot speak for every Baby Boomer, but as for myself, Global Warming is nowhere on my long list of concerns. In fact, as I say my prayers at night, I often thank my Jesus for Global Warming. During The Ice Age, The Laurentide Ice Sheet that covered North America was two miles thick.

In that environment, it would just be way too much trouble to plant my potatoes.

By the way, if given the choice between being a Drunk or an Alcoholic, I would have to choose being a Drunk because I am too busy to attend all those meetings.

I got taters to plant.

 

Mashed Potato Bag Gunny Sack Clip Art - Bag Of Potatoes Clipart PNG Image | Transparent PNG Free Download on SeekPNG

 

New 2021 Golf Rules For Seniors

 

PGA RULE CHANGES IN EFFECT FOR GOLFERS AGE 62+

Rule 9k.34– If a tree is between the ball and the hole, and the tree is deemed to be younger than the player, then the ball can be moved without penalty. This is so because this is simply a question of timing; when the player was younger, the tree was not there so the player is being penalized because of his age.

Rule 1.a.5– A ball sliced or hooked into the Rough shall be lifted and placed on the Fairway at a point equal to the distance it carried or rolled into the Rough with no penalty. The senior player should not be penalized for tall grass which ground keepers failed to mow.

Rule 2.d.6– A ball hitting a tree shall be deemed NOT to have hit the tree. This is simply bad luck and luck has no place in a scientific game. The senior player must estimate the distance the ball would have traveled if it had not hit the tree, and play the ball from there.

Rule 3.B.3– There shall be no such thing as a lost ball. The missing ball is on or near the course and will eventually be found and pocketed by someone else, thereby making it a stolen ball. The senior player is not to compound the felony by charging himself with a penalty.

Rule 4.c.7– If a putt passes over a hole without dropping, it is deemed to have dropped. The Law of Gravity supersedes the Rules of Golf.

Rule 5. – Putts that stop close enough to the cup that they could be blown in, may be blown in. This does not apply to balls more than three inches from the Hole. No one wants to make a mockery of the game.

Rule 6.a.9– There is no penalty for so-called “out of bounds”. If penny-pinching golf course owners bought sufficient land, this would not occur. The senior player deserves an apology, not a penalty.

Rule 7.G.15– There is no penalty for a ball in a water hazard, as golf balls should float. Senior players should not be penalized for any shortcomings of the manufacturers.

Rule 8.k.9– Advertisements claim that golf scores can be improved by purchasing new golf equipment. Since this is financially impractical for many senior players, one-half stroke per hole may be subtracted for using old equipment.

Please advise all your senior friends of these important rule changes and keep multiple copies in your golf bag. Those not following the rules need to be provided a copy.

Golf is…above all…a game of integrity.

 

Note From Editor: 

If God trusted golfers, he would have put little erasers on the end of those little pencils.

-Sheila Tolley-


Image result for clip art golf pencils"

S.O.S

 

A Boeing 777 wide-body jetliner was lumbering along @ 800km/hr. @ 33,000 ft. when a cocky F-16 fighter jet flashed by at Mach 2.

The F-16 pilot decided to show off. On his state-of-the-art radio that is part of
his state-of-the-art 3D & million-dollar headset, the F-16 youngster told the
777 pilot, “Hey Captain, watch this!”

He promptly went into a barrel roll, followed by a steep, unimaginable, vertical
climb. He then finished with a sonic boom as he broke the sound barrier, as
the F-16 screamed down at impossible G’s before leveling at almost sea level.

The F-16 pilot asked the 777 pilot what he thought of that?

The 777 pilot said, “That was truly impressive, but watch this!”

The 777 chugged along for about 5 minutes at the steady 800km/hour, and
then the 777 pilot came back on and said, “What did you think of that?”

Puzzled, the cocky F-16 pilot asked, “What the heck did you do?”

The 777 pilot chuckled and said, “I stood up, stretched my legs, walked to
the back, used the toilet, then got a cup of coffee and a cinnamon roll, and
secured a date for the next 3 nights in a five-star hotel paid for by the company.”

LESSON OF LIFE:
When you are young and foolish, speed and flash may seem like a good thing!
When you get older and smarter, comfort and dullness is not such a bad thing!

It’s called S.O.S.

Slower, Older, and Smarter!

Dedicated to all my friends approaching or enjoying S.O.S.

…”Don’t take life too seriously. No one gets out alive anyway.”…

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Seventeen Inches

“I have read this before, it tells an incredible story about life. I hope you will take the time to read it, as well as, my opinion at the end. It is a story you will remember.”
-Sheila Tolley-

Written by: Chris Sperry
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In Nashville, Tennessee, during the first week of January, 1996, more than 4,000 baseball coaches descended upon the Opryland Hotel for the 52nd annual ABCA convention. Nineteen times since, many of the same professional, college, high school, youth, and a slew of international coaches from passionate and developing baseball nations have gathered at various convention hotels across the country for two-and-half days of clinic presentations and industry exhibits. Sure, many members of the American Baseball Coaches Association have come and gone in those years; the leadership has been passed, nepotistically, from Dave Keilitz to his son, Craig; and the association — and baseball, in general — has lost some of its greatest coaches, including Rod Dedeaux, Gordie Gillespie, and Chuck “Bobo” Brayton.

I have attended all but three conventions in those nineteen years, and I have enjoyed and benefited from each of them. But ’96 was special — not just because it was held in the home of country music, a town I’d always wanted to visit. And not because I was attending my very first convention. Nashville in ’96 was special because it was there and then that I learned that baseball — the thing that had brought 4,000 of us together — was merely a metaphor for my own life and those of the players I hoped to impact.

While I waited in line to register with the hotel staff, I heard other more veteran coaches rumbling about the lineup of speakers scheduled to present during the weekend. One name, in particular, kept resurfacing, always with the same sentiment — “John Scolinos is here? Oh man, worth every penny of my airfare.”

Who the hell is John Scolinos, I wondered. No matter, I was just happy to be there.

Having sensed the size of the group during check-in, I woke early the next morning in order to ensure myself a good seat near the stage — first chair on the right side of the center isle, third row back — where I sat, alone, for an hour until the audio-visual techs arrived to fine-tune their equipment. The proverbial bee bee in a boxcar, I was surrounded by empty chairs in a room as large as a football field. Eventually, I was joined by other, slightly less eager, coaches until the room was filled to capacity. By the time Augie Garrido was introduced to deliver the traditional first presentation from the previous season’s College World Series winner, there wasn’t an empty chair in the room.

ABCA conventions have a certain party-like quality to them. They provide a wonderful opportunity to re-connect with old friends from a fraternal game that often spreads its coaches all over the country. As such, it is common for coaches to bail out of afternoon clinic sessions in favor of old friends and the bar. As a result, I discovered, the crowd is comparatively sparse after lunch, and I had no trouble getting my seat back, even after grabbing a plastic-wrapped sandwich off the shelf at the Opryland gift shop.

I woke early the next morning and once again found myself alone in the massive convention hall, reviewing my notes from the day before: pitching mechanics, hitting philosophy, team practice drills. All technical and typical — important stuff for a young coach, and I was in Heaven. At the end of the morning session, certain that I had accurately scouted the group dynamic and that my seat would again be waiting for me after lunch, I allowed myself a few extra minutes to sit down and enjoy an overpriced sandwich in one of the hotel restaurants. But when I returned to the convention hall thirty minutes before the lunch break ended, not only was my seat not available, barely any seats were available! I managed to find one between two high school coaches, both proudly adorned in their respective team caps and jackets. Disappointed in myself for losing my seat up front, I wondered what had pried all these coaches from their barstools. I found the clinic schedule in my bag: “1 PM John Scolinos, Cal Poly Pomona.” It was the man whose name I had heard buzzing around the lobby two days earlier. Could he be the reason that all 4,000 coaches had returned, early, to the convention hall? Wow, I thought, this guy must really be good.

I had no idea.

In 1996, Coach Scolinos was 78 years old and five years retired from a college coaching career that began in 1948. He shuffled to the stage to an impressive standing ovation, wearing dark polyester pants, a light blue shirt, and a string around his neck from which home plate hung — a full-sized, stark-white home plate.

Seriously, I wondered, who in the hell is this guy?

After speaking for twenty-five minutes, not once mentioning the prop hanging around his neck, Coach Scolinos appeared to notice the snickering among some of the coaches. Even those who knew Coach Scolinos had to wonder exactly where he was going with this, or if he had simply forgotten about home plate since he’d gotten on stage.

Then, finally …

“You’re probably all wondering why I’m wearing home plate around my neck. Or maybe you think I escaped from Camarillo State Hospital,” he said, his voice growing irascible. I laughed along with the others, acknowledging the possibility. “No,” he continued, “I may be old, but I’m not crazy. The reason I stand before you today is to share with you baseball people what I’ve learned in my life, what I’ve learned about home plate in my 78 years.”

Several hands went up when Scolinos asked how many Little League coaches were in the room. “Do you know how wide home plate is in Little League?” After a pause, someone offered, “Seventeen inches,” more question than answer.

“That’s right,” he said. “How about in Babe Ruth’s day? Any Babe Ruth coaches in the house?”

Another long pause.

“Seventeen inches?”came a guess from another reluctant coach.

“That’s right,” said Scolinos. “Now, how many high school coaches do we have in the room?” Hundreds of hands shot up, as the pattern began to appear. “How wide is home plate in high school baseball?”

“Seventeen inches,” they said, sounding more confident.

“You’re right!” Scolinos barked. “And you college coaches, how wide is home plate in college?”

“Seventeen inches!” we said, in unison.

“Any Minor League coaches here? How wide is home plate in pro ball?”

“Seventeen inches!”

“RIGHT! And in the Major Leagues, how wide is  home plate is in the Major Leagues?”

“Seventeen inches!”

“SEV-EN-TEEN INCHES!” he confirmed, his voice bellowing off the walls. “And what do they do with a a Big League pitcher who can’t throw the ball over seventeen inches?” Pause. “They send him to Pocatello!” he hollered, drawing raucous laughter.

“What they don’t do is this: they don’t say, ‘Ah, that’s okay, Jimmy. You can’t hit a seventeen-inch target? We’ll make it eighteen inches, or nineteen inches. We’ll make it twenty inches so you have a better chance of hitting it. If you can’t hit that, let us know so we can make it wider still, say twenty-five inches.’”

Pause.

“Coaches …”

Pause.

” … what do we do when our best player shows up late to practice? When our team rules forbid facial hair and a guy shows up unshaven? What if he gets caught drinking? Do we hold him accountable? Or do we change the rules to fit him, do we widen home plate?

The chuckles gradually faded as four thousand coaches grew quiet, the fog lifting as the old coach’s message began to unfold. He turned the plate toward himself and, using a Sharpie, began to draw something. When he turned it toward the crowd, point up, a house was revealed, complete with a freshly drawn door and two windows. “This is the problem in our homes today. With our marriages, with the way we parent our kids. With our discipline. We don’t teach accountability to our kids, and there is no consequence for failing to meet standards. We widen the plate!

Pause. Then, to the point at the top of the house he added a small American flag.

“This is the problem in our schools today. The quality of our education is going downhill fast and teachers have been stripped of the tools they need to be successful, and to educate and discipline our young people. We are allowing others to widen home plate! Where is that getting us?”

Silence. He replaced the flag with a Cross.

“And this is the problem in the Church, where powerful people in positions of authority have taken advantage of young children, only to have such an atrocity swept under the rug for years. Our church leaders are widening home plate!”

I was amazed. At a baseball convention where I expected to learn something about curveballs and bunting and how to run better practices, I had learned something far more valuable. From an old man with home plate strung around his neck, I had learned something about life, about myself, about my own weaknesses and about my responsibilities as a leader. I had to hold myself and others accountable to that which I knew to be right, lest our families, our faith, and our society continue down an undesirable path.

“If I am lucky,” Coach Scolinos concluded, “you will remember one thing from this old coach today. It is this: if we fail to hold ourselves to a higher standard, a standard of what we know to be right; if we fail to hold our spouses and our children to the same standards, if we are unwilling or unable to provide a consequence when they do not meet the standard; and if our schools and churches and our government fail to hold themselves accountable to those they serve, there is but one thing to look forward to …”

With that, he held home plate in front of his chest, turned it around, and revealed its dark black backside.

“… dark days ahead.”

Coach Scolinos died in 2009 at the age of 91, but not before touching the lives of hundreds of players and coaches, including mine. Meeting him at my first ABCA convention kept me returning year after year, looking for similar wisdom and inspiration from other coaches. He is the best clinic speaker the ABCA has ever known because he was so much more than a baseball coach.

His message was clear: “Coaches, keep your players — no matter how good they are — your own children, and most of all, keep yourself at seventeen inches.”

He was, indeed, worth the airfare.

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This speech by  John Scolinos was given 24 years ago. It has proven to be sadly prophetic. We have WIDENED the plate so much in America that a nappy headed man who could not make the football team has succeeded in making owners in all sports take a knee during our wonderful national anthem. Our American plate has become so wide that our cities are being burned and looted while the liberal mayors and governors could not care less. Police have been defunded and our right to bear arms is in serious jeopardy. With no hesitation, China sent us a virus that is holding America hostage.

 

We simply must NARROW the plate in our country. It is imperative that we re-elect Donald Trump in 2020.  If not…..

It is STRIKE THREE for America!

Sheila Tolley

 

UPDATE:

I originally posted this in August of 2020. The Democrats found a way (mail-in & harvested ballots) to put PINO Biden in our white house.  My own state of Georgia gave control of the Senate to the Democrats. Now they control everything. All three bases. In nine short months, they have widened  America’s plate to the size of our southern border. There are only two requirements to get you through our southern border. You must be Illegal and Non-White.

We simply must take back the house and senate in the mid-term elections and the presidency in 2024.  If not…..

It is GAME OVER for America!
-Sheila Tolley-